Upgrading old pc for gaming purposes- graphics card and processor

Asked By 0 points N/A Posted on -
qa-featured

 

I have a dated graphic card, a Geforce Series 4, on board of a not very recent pc-config. I have a dual-core processor and only 2 gigs of RAM. I have a limited budget and I would like to increase the performance of my PC for gaming purposes. Firstly, can I know how to overclock both my processor and graphics card? Secondly what is the cheapest upgrade to drastically increase the processing speed?

SHARE
Answered By 0 points N/A #193795

Upgrading old pc for gaming purposes- graphics card and processor

qa-featured

Before we can answer your question, I need to inform you first.

What I'm going to give you is not the procedure (you can find it here http://www.extremeoverclocking.com/ )

but the thought of why you should consider Overclocking, is it beneficial? what are the risks?

Over clocking hardware: the balance between benefit over damage

Let's say, you manage to  over clocked your GPU and CPU, and even your RAM. It doesn't guaranty a long term service, any moment is a chance for hardware breakdown.

Over clocking basics  = more speed, more computation = means, more POWER consumption and rapid product deterioration.

And it's not just the electric bill that will raise but also the lifespan of your hardware, so if you badly need to increase your PC performance and resort to Over clocking, then you should also be ready to take the consequences.

Now, to answer your question, Over clocking would be the cheapest way but are you ready to face the damage it will cost you?

The second way is to buy  a new specific hardware, CPU or GPU?. Buying both is out of the question as you are tight in budget. The best choice would be to buy a new GPU, although it is more Expensive than to buy a new CPU, it guaranty's future usage if ever you will change your board  in the near future, while if you buy a new CPU, you'll just be cornering your PC performance to what your board can only offer, thus making it useless when you buy a more powerful board in the near future that doesn't support your CPU socket. 

Login/Register to Answer

Related Questions