How can I see process in Red Hat Linux system?

Asked By 110 points N/A Posted on -
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I want to see how much memory is using for each process in my PC.

Is there any one can help me?

I need to see how much memory is using for each process.

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Best Answer by Taylor Lauren
Answered By 0 points N/A #133496

How can I see process in Red Hat Linux system?

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Hi Marty,

Red Hat Linux is a smart operating system. It has a lot of power tools, you can find easily solution from here.

The following can help you a lot.
 

ps  Command display process information .

#ps –aux

A  process by all users
x  process from all terminal
u  show process owner
w  include command argument
f  show process ancestry

Britnu Salu

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Best Answer
Answered By 0 points N/A #133497

How can I see process in Red Hat Linux system?

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Hi Marty,

You can also use the top command and pmap command.

Top command provides CPU usage of the processes in your Red Hat in real time and it shows more details than the ps command.  

Other options to go along with the top command includes sorting the list of processes or kill a process while viewing them.

To execute this command, just type the word 'top' as shown below.

#top

It will display the list of processes including the PID, username of each processes, amount of virtual memory it uses, percentage of the CPU usage and more.  You can refer to the top manual for details in your Red Hat.

On the other hand, to view the memory mapping of  a specific process(PID) you use the pmap command.

#pmap PID-of-the-process

This will display the process name together with the details of the memory map usage of that process.

 

Answered By 562865 points N/A #285228

How can I see process in Red Hat Linux system?

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In Microsoft Windows, if you want to see the different processes running in the background, you can easily bring up the Task Manager which displays all the processes on the computer. The Task Manager also allows you to kill or terminate any process you select which is very helpful if one of your applications had gone frozen and is no longer responding.

In Linux, viewing the background processes is also possible and can be done in different ways. First option is by running the “ps” command or process status. To try this, first, you need to be logged in as root. To log in as root, you should be using an administrator account.

If your account doesn’t have administrative privileges, you need to ask your administrator to make your account part of the admin group. Once you fulfill this, open the terminal window and enter without quotes “sudo -s” and press Enter. Enter your password when you are prompted to continue. Next, enter without quotes “ps aux | less” and press Enter.

ps aux less

The “less” option allows you to see the results one screen at a time. To go to the next screen result, press the space bar. To go back, press “B” on your keyboard. Another option to display the processes is to use the built-in GUI. In Ubuntu, you can use the default Gnome Desktop environment or the Linux Task Manager by going to “System”, “Administration”, and then “System Monitor”.

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