Using the solaris t ma win7 to monitor it.

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Does anybody know how to make the command using Solaris t ma win7 to monitor HP-UX and/or Solaris?

All I need is to create the command for showing how the devices are being used for swap activity with "iostat -x 30" when I am running Solaris.

If there anywhere the ready made command or algorithm?

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Best Answer by Copeland Hughley
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Answered By 10 points N/A #167008

Using the solaris t ma win7 to monitor it.

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Solaris, through evasion, does not use a capacity by director, the team organization by default is fashioned right on top of a board. Sun does contain a quantity boss that is extremely tied to Solaris. You can follow the below step to monitor with Solaris.

init 6  : reboot, no question asked

init 0  : shutdown and give ok prompt.  Don't use at gc as it won't be auto back up!!

init 5  : shutdown, and power off. no question asked

who -r  : show current run level (useful like when doing boot -s)

who -b  : show system boot time

shutdown, etc cmd does not seems to reboot automatically either, unless specify a reboot init level (eg -i 6)

/usr/sbin/shutdown -y -g 300 -i 6 [msg]

        -i = specify init level,

        -g = grace period in secs

        -y = yes, ie don't ask if sure again (can always cancel by killing process)

/usr/proc/bin     : lot of process controlling commands, eg ptree

date 0915               : solaris, set date (time) to 9:15 am. 

date 04060915           : solaris,hpux, set date and time to apr 6, 9:15 am.

Answered By 567090 points N/A #167009

Using the solaris t ma win7 to monitor it.

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Here are several commands you can try on HP-UX. To manage the users, you can use the commands “useradd”, “userdel”, “usermod”, “getprpw”, “modprpw”, and “pwget”. If you want to list or display the hardware configuration, use the commands “ioscan”, “dmesg”, “adb”, “model”, “stm” [from the SupportPlus CDROM], “bdf”, “getconf”, “machinfo” [requires version 11.23 and higher], and “print_manifest”.

To show or set the EEPROM / NVRAM values, use the commands “setboot”, or “stm”. If you want to add a device but you don’t want to reboot the system after adding it, you can apply the commands “inf –e”, “ioscan -fnC devtype”, and “insf -C devtype”. To simply remove a device, use the command “rmsf”.

If you need to access the tape device, use the command “/dev/rmt/0m”. To access or read the label of a disk, use the commands “scsimgr” [requires version 11.31 and higher], “diskinfo”, or “pvdisplay”. To put a label on the disk, use “pvcreate”. If you need to create a partition, use the commands “smh” [requires version 11.31 and higher], “lvcreate”, and or “sam”.

Use the commands “/hpux” [requires version 9], and or “/stand/vmunix” [requires version 10 and higher] for kernel. For displaying or setting the kernel parameters, use the commands “smh” [requires version 11.31 and higher], “sam”, “sysdef”, “kmtune” [requires version 11 and higher], “kctune” [requires version 11.23 and higher], and “getconf”. To display the loaded kernel modules, use the commands “kmadmin –s”, and “kcmodule –a” [requires version 11.23 and higher].

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