Find fix for iPad thermal issues

Asked By 40 points N/A Posted on -
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How is the heat issue addressed on the iPad units?

Is the LED backlight the only leading  cause of the issue? 

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Best Answer by Sharath Reddy
Answered By 0 points N/A #137679

Find fix for iPad thermal issues

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HI,
 
According to Raymond Soneira, who is the president of Display mate technology, the heat issues in iPad is mainly due to the LED
– There are double number of LEDs, and the heat generated by all these LEDs cause problems at full brightness
– The amount of power needed is twice. As the new iPad has more pixels more brightness is needed for a clear display.
So obviously more power is needed which adds to the heat
– In order to provide the power requirements, the battery has to deliver more, hence battery also gets warmer
 
The A5X chip packing quad-core graphics  is warmer as its speed and size is greater, which also contributes to the heat. However, we cannot point this as the main cause for the heat issues. The main issue would be related to the LED display.
The heat problems in iPad can be only fixed if they bring out a hardware and software changes. The iPad team may most probably come out with a software fix, in which they would change their code to increase the usability and efficiency of the GPU
The heat can be also reduced if you reduce the brightness of the screen. But that cannot be actually counted as a fix
Some users claim that the heating problem can be fixed by completely draining the battery and recharging it again. But there is no valid proof to trust this method.
 
Best Answer
Best Answer
Answered By 564895 points N/A #137680

Find fix for iPad thermal issues

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It was confirmed in the first quarter of 2012 that the heat issue about the iPad 2012 is really not an issue although it is quite hotter than the previous iPad 2 but it is not as hot as most laptops do under the same conditions. That’s what they have concluded after spending several hours of testing in the New York and San Francisco Labs of CNET. The test was done using a Heat Seeker. It is an infrared gun-style thermometer that is very helpful in measuring electrical circuits, car batteries, and heating ducts.

The test was done on iPad and iPad 2 assessing each device’s temperature on all four back corners including the Apple logo in the middle. The first step in the test was to let the devices cool down for around 20 minutes, turned them on, and then get the initial measurements on each device setting the screen at its full brightness. Then they started playing a graphically heavy game on both devices with its Wi-Fi on for about 15 minutes then they read the temperatures again on the same corners as before.

The test is a kind of benchmarking. Their final assumption is that it doesn’t get that hot as if you already can cook an egg on it. CNET won’t change their buying recommendation on the device just because it gets hotter than the usual because it is the highest rated tablet on their site that time.

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