Filthy shutdown on Linux Box

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After a filthy shutdown on my Linux, the kernel starts checking the file system on the file. Where or how does kernel recognize when or if my last reboot was filthy? Can anyone please send some ideas? Thank you.

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Best Answer by evolutionman
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Answered By 0 points N/A #118138

Filthy shutdown on Linux Box

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Generally, the kernel makes use of system calls like 'read' and 'write' so as to offer an abstraction of your hardware.  This is what happens inside the Kernel:

 

In Linux, a "panic" is a lost system error that is noticed by the kernel, as it is different to comparable errors detected by user space code. The kernel code is able to show such a state by calling the panic function that is found in the header file sys/system.h. Nevertheless, most panics are an end result of unhandled processor exclusion in kernel code, for example references to invalid memory addresses. These are normally indicative of a bug anywhere in the call chain causing the panic. 

Answered By 0 points N/A #118140

Filthy shutdown on Linux Box

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When the system it running, all logs pertaining events that are happening, programs that are being executed and errors that occur during the execution are kept by the system, and therefore in your last reboot did not go well, then the system can readily retrieve that information from the system log.

When the kernel starts checking the file system on reboot, it is advisable that you let it finish with the process because just in case any errors may have occurred when the system malfunctioned that left bugs that may affect the system, then it is possible that they will be fixed during the check disk process. And therefore interrupting the system may cause it to have problems that might affect its performance.

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Thompson Locker

 

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