Computers Can Tell If Users Are Bored Or Not

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According to recent studies, computers can tell if the user using the computer is bored or no. How is it capable of doing so? How does this feature work?

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Answered By 30 points N/A #186183

Computers Can Tell If Users Are Bored Or Not

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Hi

When a person working on a computer is really absorbed in what he/she is doing, the movements he makes are more like typing vigorously, using the mouse continuously, etc. However, when a person is bored, the movements he usually makes are less in number. Judging by the measurement of the person’s movements, we can determine if the person is bored. 

Answered By 566835 points N/A #186185

Computers Can Tell If Users Are Bored Or Not

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According to a post on Sophos’ Naked Security, there is a new study from a body-language expert at BSMS or Brighton and Sussex Medical School in the United Kingdom that it is possible for a computer to tell if the user is bored through how much he twitch while reading something on the screen, following your small, instinctive movements.

According to Dr. Harry Witchel, Discipline Leader in Physiology, the study showed that when someone is actually extremely connected in what they are doing, they suppress these small involuntary movements. It is no different as with a small child who is typically constantly on the go, stares wide open at cartoons on TV without moving a muscle.

The school believes the finding can have an influence on the development of AI or artificial intelligence. The BSMS study included 27 participating kids who faced a variety of 3-minute stimuli on a computer from mesmerizing games to dreary readings from banking regulation. All participants were given a handheld trackball to lessen instrumental movements, such as those we make when we move a mouse.

Afterward, their movements were calculated or quantified over the three minutes by means of video motion tracking. Among two similar reading tasks, BSMS says the less boring reading resulted in a major decline, 42 percent (42%) of movement.

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